Music World & Dating World

There is this crazy thing called dating. I know it’s been around forever and it’s how we find this thing called our “soulmate”. If you follow my blog, I talk a lot of my stresses, my ups, and downs, but not so much about my dating life.

Let me make this clear, I’m not writing this blog because I think the music industry is “bad”. I love what I do and I’m passionate about music ( as you all know). However, there are a lot of life adjustments and compromises you need to make to have your life work. One of them is dating.

Here is how the ” Hi, I’m Jaimee, I work in the music industry.” dating conversation that is called “my life” in a nutshell.

Literally… pretty much every conversation goes: ( In bold is me)

“Oh! You work in music that is so cool! What do you do”

“I help make the show run smoothly. Basically, any fires that need to be put out, I put them out.”

“Oh, so what exactly is your title?”

“Production assistant/coordinator, it changes from gig to gig.”

“Oh cool, you’ve probably have worked with some pretty amazing acts.”

“Yes, I’m grateful for the opportunity with the ups and downs of my job.”

” So what are your hours like?”

“They are pretty much all over the place, it depends on the gig. My job/festival/tour changes from gig to gig.”

” Oh, I see…”

I’ve had this exact conversation at least 20 times in the past year. Guys find me fascinating, but they don’t walk into the unknown, that is my job.

Long story short, if people don’t work shows, they have a hard time understanding what I do. And therefore, get freaked out from the unknown of hours, will I have time for anything, when I’ll be available, am I partying with the artist…

It blows my mind most guys won’t give me a chance. But it goes for my guy friends too. Girls can’t stand when they are on the road. They look at them like they just got mono from them.

So for those of you out there that want to do this. Just know that dating will be extremely hard. And people will look at you like you just farted in public.

“Hell of a Girl”

As the season is dwindling down, I’ve been thinking a lot about this past year and what I want for myself careerwise.

Here is what I know:

  • I have way more confidence in myself then I’ve ever have before.
  • I have developed skill sets and communication skills on a different and higher level that I didn’t think was possible.
  • I know I can do any job and do it well.
  • As long as I put my mind to it, I will succeed.

This self-power I’ve developed has come a long way for me. Because the only thing I have is the power to believe in myself. And I hope as a reader and follower you will too.

I don’t know where it came from, but I do know, I need it for my career and my self-worth.

I think it’s important to reflect on what your goals are and what you want to accomplish in the next years. I do have some personal goals of mine but overall, my main focus for next year is to be part of the few woman people look up to in Nashville.

Go the Distance

So I worked on my very first music video. Like legit music video with a very well known country artist. And I’m not going to lie, it was a lot of work, but I really like it and what film entails.

However, as much of an animal I am when it comes to working, I will say I really, really do enjoy working my live events.

I guess the thrill of getting it right on the first time is just an adrenaline rush. When you work with film, you have to get the shot from three to five different angles. Which is fine, but that means you have multiple opportunities to get it right. When you do events live, you either get it right or you don’t.

But I’m very happy I’m getting more film work. Because now I can officially say I have experience on tour, festivals, corporate events, venues, reality TV and music videos. Which for me is a big deal because lets be honest, everyone wants a piece of the pie. I’m lucky to get a slice.

If You Don’t Believe Me, Believe Him

Most people who follow me, actually let me rephrase that. Most people who know me don’t know I’ve worked on a couple of documentaries and film work. My most recent work was a commercial for CMT Music Awards. So if you enjoy your show Nashville, I’m sure you will see Opie Williams on the commercials.

It’s not that I’m not interested in it, I guess I never got introduced to it until later in life. Strange because most of the time people are introduced through reading the school news or making their own music videos in middle school and high school. I was more interested in being the cool kid and a rock star.

My friend Kyle Olson and I didn’t really become good friends until after college. We went to high school together, but I was in the band, choir, and sports. He was the AV, smart  guy. Our worlds collided, but I guess our paths didn’t cross.

Long story short, he works out in LA on a ton of different shows. He made his break with America’s Next Top Model and his most recent project is The Twins: Happily Ever After. After being beaten up in high school, and breaking all the “typical rules”. Dropping out of college and leaving his hometown for his dream. I finally asked him the question that most people who want to work in entertainment want to know.

I said, “If you were someone that wanted to break into the film industry, what would you tell people and how to prepare for it?” Because let’s be honest, that’s what we are all here for. To make it.

His answer was spot on and I couldn’t agree me:

“Preparation, Patience, Persistence, Perseverance, Practice, and Pro-activity

You have to do the hard things. The things that no one else is doing. The things that scare you. The things that make you wonder how much longer you can hold on.  Those are the things that define you. Those are the things that make the difference between living a life of mediocrity or outrageous success.  The hard things are the easiest things to avoid. To excuse away. To pretend like they don’t apply to you.  The simple truth about how ordinary people accomplish outrageous feats of success is that they do the hard things that smarter, wealthier, more qualified people don’t have the courage — or desperation — to do.  Do the hard things. You might be surprised at how amazing you really are.”

And truly, I have to agree with him. I’ve been through some tough times in this industry and he has personally seen that. So if you don’t believe me, believe him.

Follow Kyle Olson to know his adventures in Hollywood:

Twitter: @HollywoodTinman

Instagram: @hollywoodtinman