We Are Not Coasting

An acquaintance (who works in the events world) who I know through coworkers and such was lucky enough to work for her mom’s company during this tough time. So when she asked me what I was doing with my time her response was, “Oh, so I guess you’re just coasting.”

First off, that is one of the most insensitive things you could ever say to someone during this pandemic. I know I can be harsh and blunt, but I’m not about hurting anyone’s feelings. Especially when the entire events and entertainment world is at a standstill. And millions of people are still out of work because of the pandemic.

Secondly, if you are that person that thinks that people like us should just “get another job” because we are “coasting”. Let me put it into perspective for you.

I have been working in the events world for the last 10 years. I’ve dedicated my life and made a lot of personal sacrifices to get to where I am today. 10 years may not seem like a lot, but that is 1/3 of my life. Essentially, my entire 20s has been dedicated to putting on events. So to tell someone like me or anyone else who works in this industry to get another job, just know that is a big slap in the face to us.

Also, I don’t know what happened to being kind to people, but a lot of us are mentally struggling. We are still trying to wrap our minds around the fact that our livelihood and our careers are done. How do I know this, just look at your social media pages. It’s devasting.

I recently saw a friend, and not only did he lose his touring job. But he was diagnosed with a rare skin disease and filed for bankruptcy. So please tell me he’s coasting. Because to me, it sounds like he’s just trying to survive.

I would also like to point out, that any show/movie you are watching during this pandemic. Those people are out of work as well. So forget about the new season of whatever show you are watching in this current moment in time.

Look, I’m not trying to be mean or shame people who work normal jobs or are lucky enough to find work. I just want people to understand. The entertainment/events world is struggling. Hard.

Most of us are not getting financial support. And if we are, it’s because we actually work for an artist/actor/production company, that is lucky enough to pay their staff. That’s like hitting the lottery right now. But I would say the majority of them can’t pay their staff. With no events, means no money coming in. And I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of companies went under. It’s the sad truth.

Also, I have a lot of friends who have started their own small businesses just to pay their bills. So if you see an old band shirt on Poshmark©, please buy the shirt from them, it might mean they have water next month.

But it’s not just the people working. It’s the local venues. It’s the small artists that have been trying to get on stage for the past 10 years. It’s the people who work at big and small venues. It’s the people who produce your favorite TV show. It’s any sporting event you can think of. I could go on and on about how many people this affects. If the entertainment world doesn’t come back like it was before, just know the economy will struggle. You can kiss the Super Bowl goodbye as well.

From the bottom of my heart, if you know someone that works in the entertainment/events world, be kind to them. Literally, ask them how they are doing. While some people may be getting back on their feet, others are trying to figure out how to pay the bills.

Are Concerts Too Soon?

With the music and entertainment world at a halt, the big question is when the next big show will be? The answer is we don’t know.

And if you have been hiding around a rock because the media is driving you nuts, you probably don’t know there have been a couple of concerts that have recently happened.

Two country artists this past weekend did have a concert. One was about a 4,000 person concert and the other about 2,000.

One artist posted very publicly on Instagram about how rowdy the show was. No social distancing and no one in the video was wearing a mask. Needless to say, it had a lot of backlash on the subject. And for good reason, because as one person posted in the comments,( This is paraphrased because I couldn’t find it in the sea of comments) what about the rest of the industry? What standard are you setting? Don’t you think it will set us back?

After having several conversations with people about it, yes a lot of people are pissed. A lot. The recklessness and how everyone else is being put in the risk of COVID-19 with no proper restrictions. People in the industry are pissed.

And as much as I want to go back to work, I have a feeling it is too soon for concerts to go back to normal. So until we figure out a way, concerts won’t be happening for a while.

 

 

“Times Like These”

It is day… I can’t even remember at this point. I feel like Tom Hanks in Cast Away. Time is just going and going… and going and going and going.

I think we are all going nuts. Believe me, I’m going stir crazy, but just know, that you are safe and you are going to get through this. Let me repeat that, you are safe and you will get through this.

I have to tell myself that every day, it’s hard to be positive during this time but you need to do it. It’s hard to keep people positive and uplifted as well. But I get it, sometimes it’s just really, really, hard.

I have several friends who have posted about their struggles and it’s difficult to know that so many people are having a strenuous time. And there isn’t much I can do about it. It’s a crappy feeling to know that people are hurting.

So now what? It’s getting close to most states to reopening. So what does that mean for entertainment? Unfortunately, we really don’t know. I don’t know and I’m not going to try to guess what is going to happen for sports and entertainment. I may not tour for the rest of the year, or maybe I could be back to work by summer. I highly doubt it, but who knows.

But for those of you, who are in the same position as me. I hope you are working around your house, hanging with your family, and working to keep moving forward with your life.

 

Balloon Girl On Tour

I will say this. Getting back into the swing of touring again, is another roller coaster in itself. Trying to get the right amount of sleep, on top of remembering to eat and then, of course, remembering if you showered that day or the night before. Did I mention you still have to do your job?!

Do I think I want to do this for the rest of my life? I don’t know. It does take a special person to live on a tour bus a be a 20-year roadie. To give up your weekends completely. To live your life on the road on someone else’s  schedule. To eat catering food three times a day and it may or may not be good food.

Woof

Are there perks to the job? Of course! Lots of perks. First off, you are working a show. I’ve spent PLENTY of money going to shows before I started working in the industry. Secondly, you do have time to have fun. Like I created Balloon Girl On Tour. It’s pretty much an inside joke between friends. But if you want to catch a glimpse of my adventures, feel free to follow on Instagram: @balloongirlontour

 

 

Just Normal People

As I climb into adulthood, I understand more and more where I stand in the industry. And as I get older, I start to understand more about stardom and what “being famous” really means.

Being famous means that you are somehow or someway famous people are associated with social media or media. And EVERYONE seems to know about EVERYTHING about your business. Whether you like it or not.

Sometimes you are famous because you are ACTUALLY good at something… other times you are not.

Either way, I read Anna Kendrick’s book about her upbringing and her world of “being famous”.  She puts in best by saying:

“I still had a tar stain in the middle of my living room floor while I was on tour promoting Up in the Air.”

… You have to read the book as to why she has a tar stain in the middle of the floor but the point is, even though she was already a household name, she still didn’t have a lot of money or ties to her name yet. And I believe she was nominated for an award for that movie.

It’s a hard lesson to learn but you have to stop comparing yourself to other people. It always looks like someone is doing better than you but the truth is, we all have a tar stain in the middle of the floor.

 

Go the Distance

So I worked on my very first music video. Like legit music video with a very well known country artist. And I’m not going to lie, it was a lot of work, but I really like it and what film entails.

However, as much of an animal I am when it comes to working, I will say I really, really do enjoy working my live events.

I guess the thrill of getting it right on the first time is just an adrenaline rush. When you work with film, you have to get the shot from three to five different angles. Which is fine, but that means you have multiple opportunities to get it right. When you do events live, you either get it right or you don’t.

But I’m very happy I’m getting more film work. Because now I can officially say I have experience on tour, festivals, corporate events, venues, reality TV and music videos. Which for me is a big deal because lets be honest, everyone wants a piece of the pie. I’m lucky to get a slice.

Don’t Give Up

For the first time ever, I really enjoy being home for Christmas. I haven’t done much since I have been here but living in nostalgia… Is that how you use it?

Anyways, I’m really excited because my dad got me a keyboard/synthesizer and I’m bringing back my saxophone to Nashville. Needless to say, I hope I get my musicianship back and hope that things will be great next year.

As I told my parents last night, I want to do it all. I want to be able to say everything I’ve ever wanted to do, I conquered and did well at it.

Music is always one of my biggest obstacles, I’ve always been able to play and read. And I was once really, really good. But life got in the way, so I hope this time it doesn’t.

Do I need a bit of practice, sure, I’ll admit it! But at one point in time, everyone did.

I hope that everything falls into place.